With many UK leisure marine businesses no doubt wondering how the Brexit decision will impact them, British Marine is already on the case for its 1,600 member companies.

IBI has been told: “British Marine is currently reviewing all the relevant EU regulations and directives and will be working with our associations and fellow industry bodies, such as the RYA, to ensure that the government’s newly-formed EU unit takes the industry’s interests into account.”

It is still early days and, depending on when Article 50 (the means of exiting the EU for the UK), is implemented there will be up to a two-year time limit before withdrawal is completed. However, a number of changes will have to be made within that time frame.

Taking account of the early stage of the exiting process, British Marine explained: “It is worth noting that, once passed, all EU directives are transposed into UK legislation, allowing us the flexibility to devise our own laws on how we reach the agreed goals.

“As such, there is no direct need for us to change any of our technical regulations following the Brexit result. For example, the Recreational Craft Directive (RCD) is transposed into UK law as the Statutory Instrument, the Recreational Craft Regulations 2004. This means that after leaving the EU, UK boatbuilders will still have to comply with the existing RCD as it is a UK Statutory Instrument (law). Ince & Co effectively addresses this point in its presentation ‘Ince & Co Implications for Business’.

“In addition, as Europe is our largest export market, those UK boat manufacturers who wish to export their product to EU member states will still have to comply with the product safety regulations in that market (RCD), just as they would have to meet the product safety regulations within the US or Brazil if they wished to export to those markets.”